Buma-Gambella trans-boundary parks steering committee meeting held.

Buma-Gambella trans-boundary parks steering committee meeting held.
Ethiopia hosted the neighbor country Republic of South Sudan to discuss and develop a draft document for the trans-boundary conservation area, in which the steering committee will work on. The discussion was held yesterday at Dessalegne Hotel Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for a day long.  In this tripartite agreement document drafting representatives from South Sudan, Ethiopia and IGAD from different level have been participated in organized manner. 
In the program the Buma-Gambella trans-boundary steering committee drafted the committees work plan which will be signed by the two countries and IGAD. The need for the organization of this steering committee is based on the core point of insuring the healthy movement of the migratory species and to create habitat connectivity between the two countries by developing conservation area that connects Buma-Gamballa national parks.  The program includes different stakeholders who will support financially and technically; GPNRS, HoA-REC&N, AP, BMP, EBI from Ethiopian side, WCS /wildlife Conservation Society/ from South Sudan and IGAD from both sides. This TBSC which was initiated by Ethiopia will be expected to work on protecting the wildlife and their habitats through developing community conservation area in enhancing the benefits of both countries communities around the conservation area.
IGAD, the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development in this regional TBSC draft document selected as a chair. After the document finalized by the current committee will be submitted for MoFA /Ministry of Foreign Affairs/ of the FDRE, Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of Republic of South Sudan and IGAD to sign the agreement. Whenever the agreement will be signed the committee career will be started and it is hoped that the successful accomplishment of this project will enable the two countries benefit better and will transform the two parks to be the second largest wildlife movement next to Serengeti.